To those on the outside, leaving an abusive relationship often seems like an easy and obvious thing to do. Those who are trapped in such a relationship, however, know just how complex and difficult it can be. It’s not as simple as just packing up one day and moving to a new house.

However, for the safety of you and your children, you need to know what to do if you are experiencing domestic violence and abuse. Here are a few tips that can help:

  • Find someone to talk to, and make sure you can trust them not to let your significant other know what you’re considering. Someone who is already abusive may be dangerous if they learn they’re in danger of losing that relationship. 
  • Remember that no one deserves to be treated like this and that it’s the abuser’s fault, not yours. They will often try to convince you that it’s your fault or that you “asked for it.” This is a lie.
  • Don’t attempt to “fix” your abusive partner on your own. It’s a noble cause. You want to help them. But you often can’t, and staying in the relationship just puts you in more danger. 
  • Figure out exactly what you’ll need after you’re on your own. For instance, your significant other may cut off access to bank accounts, so you’ll need to get cash in advance. 
  • Make a plan before you leave. Figure out where you want to go. Determine the best time to do it. If you have children, make them part of the plan. Don’t leave anything up to chance or just do this as a spur-of-the-moment decision. 

These tips can help, but you also need to work with experienced legal professionals to explore all of your options.